Sunday, July 17, 2011

Scenes: Sarikei kam pua factory - Oodles of noodles


Kam Pua at Hiek Lik cafe, 2010
33 Repok Road


Before you gobble down your oodles of noodles, think again. Have you ever wondered where the noodle stalls source their noodles from?


Blue Key 6244 wheat flour
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road


There are only a handful of production houses in Sarikei. If you are in town, look no further than the last block at Central Road (near the police station). Go down the alley (Lorong 1) to the last shop.


Kneading machine 
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road

The Blue Key brand of wheat flour is blended with water (and probably also a leavening agent like baking powder to lighten the texture) and kneaded in a machine. Yes, there's no more manual kneading.

Go early to watch the production process because they will start cleaning up at around 11am. It will be messy affair when water collides with flour.


L - Flattening machine. R- Shredding machine 
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road


The dough from the kneading machine is passed through the flattening machine to produce sheets of dough. The sheets are passed through a shredding machine to produce threads of noodles.

Rollers in the shredding machine.
The wider the gap between threads, the broader the noodles 
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road



Shredding machine
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road

If you want the broader type of mee pok, simply change the rollers to have a bigger thread (a bigger gap in the grooves).


L - mee pok; R- kam pua 
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road


Oily yellow noodles
Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road


To produce yellow and oily noodles, put the kam pua noodles in hot water and add cooking oil and voila, you have a derived a different flavour for stir fried or soup noodles like those used in Ah Zheng's stall.

 Kam Pua factory, 2010
No. 10c Central Road


Here's how to order your noodles. Stroll down to the shop or call him, 

"Towkay Wong, got noodles?"

7 comments:

melissathegreat said...

1 question. If ppl would to ask what is the difference between 'Kolok Mee' & 'Kampua Mee', how shall I explain? Thx =)

DOMINIC HII (許信惠) said...

Thanks Daniel for the big take on Sarikei Noodle factory. Before this article I have always assumed that fresh kampua noodles wonton pastry, Pien Nik and all others like chilli sauce are all from Sibu either by boat or by road transport. This article is a real eye opener.

Melissa,
I shall try as I am born a Foochow speaking Chinese but I am no expert in local food & custom. A person who runs a Kolok Mee stall could virtually get their noodle supply from the same source as a Foochow who runs a Kumpua Mee. However the difference lies in the area of sauce application and in the available presentation of ingredients.

A Kolok Mee stall in Kuching may have the same type of noodle strands in the bowl as a Foochow's say in Sibu or sarikei. But the sauce is different. Kolok Mee sometimes used dark vinegar. Kolok Mee never has char siew (roast pork) as presentation. It generally has minced pork. If you pay more you get pork liver, green veg not only with boiled intestine on the noodle itself but sometimes you find green veges in the plain soup

Foochow noodle Kampua on the other hand never changes its character and true to its form it always relate to the original poor working man's diet as Daniel the Blogger himself so mentioned. Kumua Mee does not pretend to be anything else other than a cheap quick fix so mentioned. The only simple variation in Kampua is either plain, no meat, soya sauce dark or spicy with chilli sauce. There will be no vegetables in Kumpua.

Cheers!

Kanga said...

Here is my 2 cents worth....I think 'kolok' stands for 'Ko'='gon'=dry (in cantonese), 'lok'='low'=tossing (also in cantonese) Any has a different view? As to 'kampua'; ah! over to the Foochows to explain! I am a cantonese......

I also think the ingredients and the making processes of kolok mee and kampua mee are slightly different...

Daniel Yiek said...

Kam pua noodles are also thicker and less curly than kolo mee.

Kam pua's ingredients are quite standard but kolo mee's toppings varies from stall to stall.

Full Tien at Jalan Abdul Razak in Sarikei (junction of Lorong 3 Jalan Abdul Rahman) uses kolo mee but cooks it using kam pua style and adds in minced meat as toppings. Near to bus station. Some people like it and some don't.

melissathegreat said...

Thanks for the well explanations from you guys!
I like "Elfa's" (in Sarikei) kolok mee! Each time I return..I will surely visit there.

Anonymous said...

wow! this blog is VERY GREAT! i been looking for this kampua @ dry noodles recipe...if it's also called eggs noodles? Please let me know what is the basic ingredients to make this kampua. I'll be back to your blog...txs & hv a gd day!

Sharon,
UK

Daniel Yiek said...

Sharon,
Sorry, this is not egg noodles...and I don't have the recipe for making kam pua. I'm just a blogger, not a foodie.

Good luck with your search.

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